Skip to main content

Full text of "Normalogue, The (1925)"

See other formats


ri 



A. | ( ) ■ 



• 



H ADAMS 
AL SCHOOL 



j&XLLM*- 



<*. 




Nin 





o 
o 

GO 

.J 

o 

GO 

<i 

Q 
W 
O 









^kJ £ 



o 
o 
H 

Ego 
o 



< 



DO 



•J 
o 



•J 

w 

o 
i— i 

o 
o 
< 



TO 

Mr. Wallace Venable 

The Class Of 1925 

Fondly Dedicates 

This Book 




r>4 






<; ^fr g.Vfury 1 



Contents 




Picture of Normal Buildings 

Frontispiece 

Table of Contents 

Dedicatory 

Class Officers 

Axis Staff 

On Board The Good Ship N. A. N. S. 

Song "N. A. N. S." 

N. A. N. S. Faculty 

The Class of 1925 

Program for Class Day 

Program for Graduation Day 

Address of Welcome 

Address to the Juniors 

Response to Seniors 

Words to the Class Song 

To the Colors of '25 

Class History 

Class Prophecy 

Definition of a Teacher 

Song: "Alma Mater" 

Class Will 

The Ivy Oration 

The Ivy Poem 

Dramatics 

Musical Contest 

School Notes 

Class Statistics 

Normal Wit 



1 

2 

3 

4 

7 

8 

9 

18 

44 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

48 

49 

50 

54 

56 

56 

59 

59 

60 

64 

64 

65 

67 



Itefrfratortj 



"A friend indeed, formed on the good old plan, 
A true and brave and downright honest man." 




Jk LTHOUGH, primarily we shall always regard this member of our faculty 
~* as a skillful teacher, we cannot fail to think of him in the same moment, as 
our true friend. 

To be under the guidance of such a nature-lover and zealous scholar was 
indeed a proper incentive to thoughtful work so that the hours spent in his class- 
room were full of pleasure and profit for all of us. 

Always patient and forebearing, he encouraged us to our best efforts, nor 
could his own enthusiasm fail to inspire us. 

During our two years under his capable leadership, we found him always 
ready to help us, giving generously of his time that we might profit. 

Mere words with which to express our appreciation of all he has done in pre- 
paring us to become teachers, seem ineffective indeed. We only hope that we 
may more tangibly express our gratitude by adhering to those high standards he 
has set for us in our teaching profession. 

In sincere appreciation of his work in our behalf and his many kindnesses to 
us, the members of the class of 1925 fondly dedicate to him this, our book. 



Class ©fftr^rs 





MAY TRACY 

CLASS PRESIDENT 



MARION COOK 

VICE PRESIDENT 




MISS BARIGHT 

CLASS ADVISOR 





ANNETTE O'NEIL 

SECRETARY 



MARJORIE BOYLE 

TREASURER 



Axis ^taff 



■ 





KATHERINE CROWLEY 

BUS. MANAGER 



MAY WEBER 

BUS. MANAGER 




LAURIE MACGREGOR 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 





MARYON COOK 

BUS. MANAGER 



MARJORIE BOYLE 

BUS. MANAGER 



THE NORMALOGUE 




ANNETTE O'NEIL 

CIRCULATING MANAGER 




D. CHITTIM 

SCHOOL NOTES EDITOR 




MAY TRACY 

SR. NOTES EDITOR 







ANNE HENDERSON 

SR. NOTES EDITOR 







MARGARET CORKERY 

JOKE EDITOR 




LILLIA SIDNEY 

ART EDITOR 



THE NORMALOGUE 




ANTOINETTE MURRAY 

ART EDITOR 




FLOSSIE CROMACK 

ALUMNAE NOTES ED. 




BEATRICE ROWAN 

ALUMNAE NOTES ED. 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Editorial 



ON BOARD THE GOOD SHIP N. A. N. S. 



^IjEAVE to, my classmates, we're about to drop anchor after an immensely enjoyable voy- 
^* age, sailing through the heavy seas of training, for one of the most noble professions in 
the cause of humanity! 

Many moons ago, from north, south, east and west, most of us with poorly rigged ships, 
gathered at the harbor of North Adams, in the fall of '23, to set sail upon our anticipated jour- 
ney aboard the good ship N. A. N. S., through the region of the Veiled Future to the land of 
our Heart's Desire. Definite plans were considered, after which a successful and interesting 
itinerary was arranged by our worthy captain, Mr. Smith. 

As everything was in readiness, we set sail the morning of September 12, 1923, and 
the weather favorable. Many a girl, looking at the restless sea, was comforted by some 
such scene as the beautiful islands of Comradeship or Helpfulness, as the ship surged past 
through the roaring waves. Unceasingly, codes were received from our home stations, giving 
us cheer and welcome messages. 

Every morn, as the sun rose in the east, it brought its own joy; and every evening as 
the same glowing ball of fire cast its fading rays o'er the western sky, it left each girl with 
longing for the worthier and nobler things of Life; with a keen desire to execute the highest 
ideals to which we might aspire. 

Although seemingly cruel at times, more often the sea was as calm and tranquil as a 
placid lake. How much more encouraging it was on these occasions, than when alive with a 
spirit of unrest. Constantly, we were reminded, that, "The sea is held in check not by a wall 
of brick but by a beach of sand". The ocean, working such marvellous miracles, exhibited a 
lesson to the shipmates not to be forgotten, instantly. We learned to be more patient, sympa- 
thetic and loving to our fellow voyagers. 

All too quickly, our delightful trip on board the N. A. N. S. is drawing to a close. To 
all my classmates, "Dorm" girls and "Town", some who are to dock permanently, and those 
of you who are to board other ships and continue your voyage, I, as a friend to all, wish every- 
one a "bon voyage", on any additional journey which you may endeavor to undertake. 

A. Laurie Macgregor, '25 



8 



THE NORMALOGUE 



N.A.N.S. 



>",i Kn n- 



-e* 



Frf 



N. A N S we ' oVe t^ee blue be tl^e 




ZXZ 



s 



£^JL 



$Kie$ a - bove ibeej tmetetky colors V€ wJ/ be; 



r «ljj 



* 



E 



Lx. 




Where'er we rojmo* \ah4 or sca ? Xh loifal- 

tee 



*■ 



£*. 



s 




; 




ty UK- ii- tho, ever our cause We're p|,'^kt- 



'J 1 In \r 1 r 



*■ 



a 




jh^ always to leveavid serve -k nee, 



p^ 



^^ 



N. A. 



N. 



Slje Jffaculftj 




Roy L. Smith 

North Adams, Mass. 

Principal, teacher of Psychology 
"Next to human friendships for inspiration is the 
friendship of great thoughts." 

Who wouldn't be willing to be an amoeba or a 
Paramecium after Mr. Smith sings their praises? 
When we finish our course with him we feel sure we 
could pass any "intelligence" test. 



Mr. Clinton E. Carpenter 

North Adams, Mass. 

Teacher of Child Study, Management and Penman- 
ship 

"I am not a teacher, only a fellow traveller of 
whom you ask the way." 

4 

Mr. Carpenter has helped every girl at N. A. 
N. S. by his thorough courses, and has won the 
esteem of 1925 by his kindliness and ever cheery smile. 




10 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Mary A. Pearson 

Art Teacher 

"Grace was in all her steps, heaven in all her eye, 
In every gesture dignity and love." 

Miss Pearson, our art teacher, is loved by one 
and all. She is so dignified and stately, but at the 
same time so pleasant and full of fun. In whom 
else could we find all these characteristics so well 
combined? 



Mary Louise Baright 

Framingham, Mass. 

Teacher of Literature, Grammar, Oral Composition, 
Reading, Story-Telling, Language. 

"Better than gold is the thinking mind." 

Who will remember Normal School without 
thinking often of the Literature room and the many 
happy hours spent there? Miss Baright, many 
times, has held us in deepest reverence with one of 
her readings. She has always been our true friend, 
our class advisor, and was chosen as the teacher best 
liked by the class of '25. We leave her with regret. 




THE NORMALOGUE 



11 




Annie C. Skeele 

Church Street, 

North Adams, Mass. 

Instructor of Physical Education and Hygiene 

"Just square your shoulders to the world, 
You're not the sort to quit, 
It isn't the load that breaks you down, 
It's the way you carry it." 

It is not difficult for the girls at N. A. N. S. 
to believe that this little quotation which Miss Skeele 
added to our supply of advice is faithfully practised 
as well as preached. 



Miss Evelyn C. Perry 

Monument Beech, Mass. 

"Music is the universal language of all mankind." 

To Miss Perry, we owe our keener appreciation 
and love of music. Never can we forget the pleasure 
and happiness that her music has given us on many 
occasions. The Class of '25 wish for her, happiness 
and success in every undertaking. 




12 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Albert G. Eldridge 

303 East Main St., 

North Adams, Mass. 

Teacher of Geography, Economics, History, Ethics 

"The world needs doers, but without the thinkers 
the doers would have nothing to do." 

We certainly have been benefited by our two 
years' association with this great thinker, and wish 
to express our appreciation of the many suggestions 
Mr. Eldridge has given us in geography and eco- 
nomics. 



Bertha M. Sholes 
North Adams, Mass. 
Teacher of Domestic Arts 
"Duties well performed, and days well spent." 

Miss Sholes' quiet dignity and smiling face have 
helped to make our school life pleasant. 

We shall miss her next year, but we shall not 
forget her useful advice. 




THE NORMALOGUE 



13 




Mr. Thomas Cummings 

North Adams, Mass. 
Manual Training Instructor 

"Saws, hammers, chisels and paint, what memories 
do these awake in you." 

The happy and enjoyable hours have been spent 
with Mr. Cummings who was always ready to help 
when help was needed most. 



Annie J. Lamphier 

North Adams, Mass. 

"With wisdom and wit her presence she made felt." 

Misfortune was ours when we had to give up 
Miss Lamphier for a while. We surely have missed 
her. That she may have a speedy recovery and re- 
turn to the school she loves is our wish for her. 




y 



14 



THE NORMALOGUE 



Miss Alice Owens 

North Adams, Mass. 

History of Education, Primary Reading 

"A heart at leisure from itself 
To smooth and sympathize." 

Happy was our introduction to Comenius, Locke 
and Rousseau. Whenever we find their august 
names, we will think of those periods spent with her. 




Mrs. Therza Van Etten 

House Matron 

"How lady-like, how queen-like she appears." 

Our two years at N. A. N. S. have brought us 
into close contact with our house mother, whom we 
all love dearly. We know she will continue to be a 
true friend to all who come under her care. 



THENORMALOGUE 15 



Mrs. Blanche Gellis 

North Adams, Mass. 

Assistant House Matron 

"To know her is to love her." 

What volumes of good can every girl of Taconic 
Hall say about our assistant matron, Mrs. Gellis! 
May her years be many so that countless other girls 
shall learn to know and love her. 




Fannie A. Bishop 
Willimantic, Conn. 

Kindergarten Supervisor, Teacher of Kindergarten 

Theory 

"Ah, what would the world be to us 
If the children were no morel" 

By her willing help as Kindergartener, Miss 
Bishop has given a great goal to strive for, in the 
loving understanding, and training of little children. 

We hope her future years may be full of happi- 
ness and success. 



Miss Grace Louise Donelson 

Colrain, Mass. 

Librarian 

"A friend in need is a friend indeed." 

Miss Donelson was kind and friendly not only 
when we needed her in the library, but at all times 
she was ready to help. Her quiet and charming 
manner is the ideal of many a girl. 



16 



THE NORMALOGUE 



Miss Elizabeth Jenkins 

North Adams, Mass. 

Supervisor of rural schools, Head of Extension Dept. 

"And welcome whereso'er she went, 
A calm and graceful element." 

Well shall we remember the helpful suggestions 
Miss Jenkins gave us concerning rural schools, and 
we are looking forward to a visit from her next year. 



Miss Bertha Allyn 

Secretary 

"Never idle a moment but thrifty and thoughtful 
of others." 

Miss Allyn will always be remembered by the 
class of '25 for we found in her a true friend. 



Miss Teresa Ferguson 

North Adams, Mass. 

Secretary and Treasurer 

"To have a friend is to be one." 

What girls do not appreciate what Miss Fergu- 
son has done for us, especially when wanting a 
check cashed or a slip signed? 




THE CLASS OF 1925 




Persis Gibson Andrews "Perk" 

Deerfield, Mass. 
Senior Council Member, Glee Club. 
"A woman is always changeable and capricious." 

From Old Deerfield came Persis. Few of us guessed 
that she was an experienced teacher since teasing was a 
sport she much enjoyed. However she became digni- 
fied long enough to serve on the council this year. 



Eleanore Bachinski "Leona" 
Adams, Mass. 

Senior Play 

"With such a comradi, such a friend 
I fain would walk till journeys* end." 

Kindhearted, generous, and fun-loving, she was al- 
ways willing to lend a hand or car tickets to her 
commuters or "dorm" friends. May virtues turn out 
to be blessings and bring their sure reward. 





ISABELLE MUNRO BARBER "IZZY" 

138 Church Street 
North Adams, Mass. 

Ahkasahwin, Fever in Class Play 
"Witty to talk with, pleasant to walk with." 

Isabelle's spontaneous laughter has rung thru our 
halls, and her voice "from the Kingdom of Ponemah" 
thrilled us with its unearthly tones. We all know that 
some day our Alma Mater will be proud of Isabelle. 



20 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Barbara Beebe 
Williamstown, Mass. 

Glee Club 

"May your joys be as deep as the ocean 
Your troubles as light as its foam." 

Since Barb's arrival at N. A. N. S. in Feb- 
ruary, her everlasting good nature and wholesome spirit 
have won for her a host of friends. We wish her all 
success in the future. 



Marjorie Boyle "Marge" 
Hatfield, Mass. 

Class Treasurer 

"To see her is to like her, to know her is to love her." 

"Marge" is always ready with a cheery smile and 
a helping hand. How many times she has provided an 
evening's entertainment with accounts of her week-end 
experiences! Success and happiness to "Marge". 





Gladys E. Campbell "Red" 

Easthampton, Mass. 

Glee Club, Student Council, Class Play. 

"Dance light, for my heart it lies under your feet." 

We can always tell Gladys by her flaming hair as 
she trips lightly and gracefully along. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



21 




Yvonne Cayer 

Grande Ligne, P. Q. 
Canada 

Class President of '24, Junior Response Speaker, 

Class Play 

"Nothing is impossible to a willing heart." 

Yvonne has been one of the most active and influ- 
encial girls in all of our school affairs. Whenever there 
wa3 a task to be done she was always ready to do it. 
When we named her as the girl most likely to succeed, 
I am sure we were right. 



Doris Mae Chittim "Dot" 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Junior Secretary, Axis Staff, Glee Club, Council, 

Class Play 

"To those who know thee not, no words can paint; 
To those who know thee, all words are faint." 

When thinking of Doris some recall only the merry 
dances and a certain Johnnie who comes to town, but 
others remember her deeper qualities through which she 
will form many friendships. 





Anna Sarell Cohen 
North Adams, Mass. 

"How brilliant and mirthful the light of her eyes." 

Who has not felt the charm of Anna's sunny smile? 
Her earnest, determined soul shines through her brown 
eyes, now serious and thoughtful, now bubbling over 
with uncontrolled mirth. We envy her pupils, and 
wish success to her. 



22 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Maryon Hungerford Cook "Cookie" 

65 Elizabeth St., 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Vice President, Best All-round Girl, Business 

Manager of Axis, Chairman of Stage Properties 

Committee, Speaker at Graduation 

"There is no truer hearted, 

Never idle a moment, but thrifty and thoughtful of others.' 



Margaret Mary Corkery "Peg" 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Glee Club, Gym Captain, Senior Play, Axis Staff, 
Council Member 

"Laugh and the world laughs with you." 

We know that is Peg's rule of life. Why is it that 
laughter and fun always follow her? It must be her 
personality. She is always there, to work or play. 





Harriet Frances Couch 

Canaan, Conn. 

"Thy dimpling cheek and deep blue eye, 
Where tender thought and feeling lie." 

For a steadfast friend, a cheerful companion, and 
a faithful worker, there's no-one quite like Harriet. 
Her winning smile and pedagogical ability will lead her 
far on the road to fame and fortune. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



23 




Flossie Lurancy Cromack "Floss" 

Colrain, Mass. 

"Revealings deep and clear are thine 
Of wealthy smiles." 

During Flossie's life here, she has made many 
friends. She will always be remembered for her good 
disposition and her red hair. We know that Flossie will 
succeed in her profession as a teacher. 



Katherine Crowley "Kay" 
Northampton, Mass. 

Council, Business Manager of Axis, Class Play. 

"I would rather be small and shine than be 
large and cast a shadow." 

Kay has made many friends in her successful two 
years at N. A. N. S. who will wish her equal success in 
the future. 





Ellen Frances Dinneen "Chief" 
90 Blackinton Street, 
North Adams, Mass. 

Priest in the Class Play 

"That inexhaustible good nature which is in itself the 
most precious gift from heaven." 

Her wit and humor have made her the life of the 
class, and 1925 is very proud of its "nurse-teacher". 
They expect great things from her. 



24 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Olive Liscom Doolittle 
South Vernon, Mass. 

Vice President of Council. 

"A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance." 

After teaching two years, Olive joined our number 
at N. A. N. S. We have found her an all around good 
sport. Olive, we wish you all the success you can carry 
with you for future use. 



Ruth Katherine Dunn 

North Adams, Mass. 

Class Play 

"What is yours is mine and all mine is yours." 

With eyes that rival the sun in their brightness 
and an ever present willingness to do a favor, Ruth early 
won for herself a warm spot in our hearts. 





Vera M. Dunn "Dunny" 

Great Barrington, Mass. 

"Some think the world is full of fun and frolic, and 
so do /." 

Vera is a wonder, and she certainly is original — 
whether it be impersonating people — or getting into 
mischief. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



25 




Hester Margaret Farley "Hess" 

North Adams, Mass. 

Class Play 

"These humble words are all too few 
To say how much we think of you." 

The possession of ready wit and good spirits 
has made "Hess" a most desirable classmate. As years 
roll on and memories become sweeter, we shall like to 
recall "Hess" as a sincere and delightful companion, a 
true and loyal friend. 



Mary Fenton 
46 Salem Street, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

Glee Club, Class Play, Gym Captain. 
"Laugh and the World laughs with yGU." 

Everyone likes Mary for she's a good sport, a good 
pal, and full of fun. 





Anne Patricia Fitzgerald 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
Gym Captain 

"Here she comes, there she goes, everybody's dear." 

"Hello, Hello, everybody!" Here comes Anne! 
Who at Normal will ever forget her ever changing moods? 



26 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Cecelia Frances Fitzgerald "Chick" 
55 Columbia Ave., 

Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
Class Play 
"A smile for all, a welcome glad, a jovial coaxing way 
she had." 

Greetings to Chick and welcome always! May love 
and success follow her days. Her kindness, her good- 
ness, her love and her fun, will always be sacred to 
every one. 



Mabelle Elizabeth Floyd "Betty" 
North Adams, Mass. 

Glee Club, "Cleverest Girl," "Hiawatha," in class play. 

"Betty's" cleverness was shown by her fine por- 
trayal of Hiawatha in our class play. Was there ever 
anything into which she did not enter heartily? 








a 


^J 


!■■ 





Thelma Goddard 
Brookfield, Mass. 

House President 

"Such a one do I remember, whom to look at was to love." 

Because of her previous teaching, Thelma remained 
with us only until February. As house president she 
served us diligently, as "Priscilla" she charmed every- 
one, but all too soon she left us to teach in Greenfield. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



27 




Mary Elizabeth Gunning 
North Adams, Mass. 

"Why aren't they all content like met" 

Gifted with a winning personality, she has proven 
herself a reliable associate, a worthwhile pal, and a dis- 
tinguished student. Success is bound to come. 



Margaret Haggerty "Marg" 

North Adams, Mass. 

"And when a man's in the case 

You know all other things give 'place." 

Here's to "Marg", as fair as she is wise, who al- 
though fond of pleasure never neglects duty for good 
times. Our heartiest wish is that she will have great 
happiness. 





Carrie Dudley Hancock 
Barre, Mass. 

"Thy fair hair my heart enchained." 

After a year and a half Carrie left us and began to 
instruct young innocents in the lore of reading, writing 
and arithmetic. 



'ijljl: 



28 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Ethel Irene Hemenway 
North Adams, Mass. 

Glee Club 

"Good and true and jolly, too." 

Here's a friend of all, and one of the jolliest girls 
in the class. May she always be happy and beloved 
as she is now. 



Ann Henderson 
North Adams, Mass. 

"To her whose happy smile has won a place in every heart." 

Here is our Ann! An athlete of no little ability, 
an excellent scholar and an all-round good sport. 
We wish her all the success she deserves. 





Mary Eleanor Hickey "Babe" 

66 Lincoln Street, 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Basketball Captain, Member of Glee Club, Chairman 
of Advertising Committee for Senior Play. 

"Studious, ambitious, athletic is she, 
Always successful may she be." 

"Gym" is "Babe's" favorite subject, into which 
she puts her whole heart and soul, and the side which 
she plays on is sure to win. We expect to hear of great 
triumphs accomplished by her. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



29 




Ruth Estella Holden "Rufus" 
North Amherst, Mass. 

"Bright was her face with smiles." 

We shall never forget Ruth's sweet disposition and 
perpetual smile. Do you remember that curl that used 
to adorn her head? One day, Snip! Snip! It hasn't 
been seen since. 



Linda Howlett 

Southampton, Mass. 

Glee Club, Class Play. 

"A soul 

So full of summer warmth so glad,, 

So healthy, sound, and clear and whole." 

Linda's membership in the Glee Club and part in 
the Senior Play gave us an idea of her ability. She has 
served also on various committees where she has been 
very helpful. 





Martha Illingworth 

North Adams, Mass. 

"Sweet are the thoughts that savor of content; 
The quiet mind is richer than a crown." 

Martha is one of the girls who appears to have a 
quiet mind in that she dees not have a great deal to say, 
but she has the richer crown than most of us. 



30 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Agnes Jackson "Ag" 
Bennington, Vt. 

Gymnasium Captain 

" 'Tis something to be willing to command, 
But my best is, that I am your friend." 

Not only in ability to shoot baskets but also in 
popularity "Ag" was a high scorer. May all her troubles 
be little ones. 









Antonia Irene Janick "Antone" 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Glee Club, Gym Captain, Council. 

"Antone the fair, Antone the lovable, 
Antone the sweetest girl of Normal." 

One of those cute little blondes, she is in on every- 
thing because there isn't anything she can't do. 







Ethel Annette Kaplan "Boots" 
South Street, 
Ware, Mass. 

Glee Club 

"Ethel is jolly, Ethel is gay, 

Ethel is sweet in her own true way." 

Dark, bobbed hair, a smile, and twinkling eyes 
which even a pair of glasses cannot conceal! 

Ethel has a keen business instinct and we knew 
whether or not she sticks to her chosen profession of 
teaching she is bound to succeed in life. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



31 



Anna Gertrude Kennedy "Ann" 
Maple Street, 

Ware, Mass. 

"Ann may be little yet she is wise 

For nothing escapes her bright blue eyes." 

Ann may be quiet among the girls in class yet she 
is always ready to do her share toward the success of 
any event. With her wonderful personality we all 
know she will succeed in her chosen profession. 



Bertha V. Kerr "B" 
North Adams, Mass. 

Glee Club, Music Contest, Senior Play, "Best Singer'" 

"Most Prompt". 

"Small of stature, but great of mind." 

We are sure "B" with her experience and many 
talents will succeed. We wish her every joy and much 
happiness. Her friends will be many for she is a friend 
to all. 





Kathryn Agnes Kiely 

North Adams, Mass. 



'Kay" 



"Do what you consid2r right whatever the people 

think of it, 
Despise its censure and its praise." 

Possessed of irrepressible good nature and genuine 
passion for genial comradeship, "Kay" has ever cul- 
tivated the happy faculty to ripple with inward laughter. 



32 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Lura Lorna Lamb "Lambie" 
940 Holmes Road, 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

Glee Club, Council. 

"The sweetest music slips 
From her merry, maddening lips 
When she sings." 

Who does not love our Lura, one of the inspiring 
workers of '25? She enters and excels in all activities. 
We shall remember her always as a loyal, studious mem- 
ber and friend. 



Emma L anger 
Adams, Mass. 

Emma is one of our girls who is rarely seen but 
often heard. Whatever she does, she does well, and 
we know that she will continue her fine work in her 
future teaching. 





Rose R. Larkin 
Great Barrington, Mass. 

Glee Club, Gym Captain 

" 'Tis the song you sing and the smile you wear, 
That makes the sunshine everywhere." 

Besides, we can never forget how Rose "rushes" 
studies, games, and people. But she always stays in 
the lead. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



33 




Veronica Loftus 
North Adams, Mass. 

Basketball Captain 
"Just let her smile and your cares will depart." 

Veronica's calm, tranquil disposition has enabled 
her to pass unruffled thru storm and sunshine. Her 
willingness to help others has endeared her to all and 
we wish her success in all she undertakes. 



Annie Laurie Macgregor 

21 Warland Street, 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Prophecy, Class Play, Editor of Axis. 

"And for bonnie Annie Laurie, 
Fd lay me down and dee." 

Our Laurie, a true Scotch lassie, was vice-president 
of our Junior class and editor of our Axis. She also 
shares with the class president the compliment of having 
done most for the class of '25. We shall always re- 
member her with tenderest affection. 





Julia I. Martin "Judy" 
Monterey, Mass. 

School Council 

"Julia is jolly, Julia is gay, 

She studies hard from day to day. 

Here is a girl we shall never forget; 

If she has an equal we've not seen her yet." 

As a special, Julia with her generous heart gave out 
a kindly thought a minute, and made our school a whole 
lot better just by being in it. 



34 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Antoinette R. Murray "Tony" 
North Adams, Mass. 

"Let me live in the house by the side of the road 
And be a friend to man." 

Antoinette known through her excellent drawings, 
is the most willing girl in the whole class to give a kind 
suggestion or to help in any way. 

We shall always think of her as a real friend and an 
earnest student. 



Alice O'Brien "Allie" 

Church Street, 

Lenox, Mass. 

Member of the Council 

"Happy am I; from care I am free. 

II hy aren't they all contented like mel" 

Allie has endeared herself to the hearts of her many 
friends at N. A. N. S. with her pleasant smile and quiet 
manner. As council member she has tried to keep third 
floor under control. 








Annette H. Fahlon O'Neil 

182 Veazie Street, 

North Adams, Mass. 

Glee Club Librarian, Class Play, Class Secretary, 

Axis Staff 
"A daughter of the Ccds, divinely tall and most divinely 
fair." 

There are so many things to say about Annette, 
let's make it like her, short (?), sweet and neat, and say 
— just perfect. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



35 







Olive Marian Owen 
Amherst, Mass. 

"To be slow in ivords is woman's only virtue." 

Although some folks think Olive is quiet, to those 
who know her best, she is a good sport. Ask any of 
the girls on second floor and see what they'll tell you 
about it. 



Helen Frances Pendergast 
7 Bethany Road, 
Monson, Mass. 



"Pendie" 



Member of the Sing Contest, Speaker in Class De- 
bate, Glee Club, Chairman of Lights Committee 
for Senior Play, Class Chatter Box. 

"I chatter, chatter as I go." 

What a vivacious little miss! 

Always happy, always gay; 

Laughing as she goes her way. 

Won't we miss the sound of her voice? 





Hazel Lavinia Perkins "buster" 
Canaan, Conn. R. F. D. 

"Come and trip it as ye go 
On the light fantastic toe." 

Perkie, a jolly friend to all, is apt to be found in- 
dulging in gorgeous feeds or whiling away happy hours 
in the dance hall. We wish the best of luck to her. 



36 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Mabelle A. Potter "Belle" 
Rowe, Mass. 

"To him who, in the love of Nature, holds 
Communion with her visible forms, she speaks 
A various language: and a smile 
And eloquence of beauty; " 

Mabelle is one of the girls who will make good in 
her line. We know she will meet our expectations and 
be a great leader in Nature Study. 



Rhoda M. Pratt "Rho" 
Pownal, Vermont 

'True of heart and ever kind." 



v 



Although Rhoda comes from outside the state, we 
all realize what a valuable addition she is to our school. 
Helpful and sympathetic, she had endeared herself to 
us all. 





Anna E. Rachdorf 
North Adams, Mass. 

Class Play 

"With such a comrade, such a friend 
We fain would walk till journey's end." 

Anna, chosen as the best natured girl in the class, 
is an interesting and delightful companion. We feel 
sure that she will meet the storms of life calmly and 
efficiently. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



37 




Margaret Rockwood "Dub" 

Weeks Street 
Bennington, Vermont. 
"Cutest Girl" 
"She may be small, but Oh My! 
There's a mischievous twinkle in her eye." 
We all wish that "Dub" could have shown her 
dramatic ability in "Hiawatha" for we know she has 
it. Best wishes for success to "Dub" in her chosen 
profession. 



Beatrice Mildred Rowan "Bea" 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

Glee Club, Debate, Class Play, House President 

Axis Staff 

"Her air, her manners, all who saw admired, 
Courteous though coy, and gentle though retired 
The joy of earth and health, her eyes displayed 
And ease of heart her every look conveyed." 





Maie Burns Ryan 
Adams, Mass. 

Gym Capt., Glee Club, Class Play 

"Trusty, dusky, vivid, true 
Steel true and blade straight." 

All hail to the all-round girl of the class! A prin- 
cess in disguise, and a friend to everyone! The love 
and the best wishes of the class go with "I'm all in." 



38 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Gertrude Scheffer "Gert" 
Williamstown, Mass. 

"She's all my fancy painted her; 
She's lovely, she's divine." 

Small wonder "Gert" carried off the beauty honors 
so justly deserved. Here's hoping her pupils will appre- 
ciate her as much as we do! 



Dorothy Grace Shaw 

Sutton, Mass. 



'Dot" 



"If she will — she will, and you may depend on't 
And if she won't, she won't a%d that's the er.d on't." 

Another one of our little girls is Dot, who came way 
up from Sutton to be with us. She is always happy 
and cheerful, ever an inspiration to her friends and her 
classmates. 





Lillia Franklin Sidney 
82 Lakeview Ave., 
Melrose, Mass. 

Class Will; General Stage Manager 
"All Nature is but Art, Unknown to Many." 

Lillia is one of our classmates who possesses that 
dignified air so desired by those of her profession. How 
frequently has she cheerfully aided her friends when 
they were confronted with problems of drawing. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



39 




Eleanor Duncan Sisson "Bubbles" 
159 Sumner Ave., 
Springfield, Mass. 



'Sister" 



Ivy Poem, Class Poet, Most Lovable, Class Darling 

"Blue are her eyes as the fairy flax 

Her cheeks like the dawn of day." 

Do you wonder she was chosen the darling, lovable, 
poet of '25? She has tripped into our hearts to stay and 
here's best wishes for success to El-ya-nore. 



Katherine Frances Slattery 
Greenfield, Mass. 



'Kay" 



Composer of Class Song, Glee Club 

"How her fingers went when they moved by note 
Thru measures fine, as she marched them o'er 
The yielding plank of the ivory floor." 

During Katherine's course at Normal she has made 
many friends. Besides maintaining a very creditable 
scholastic standing the honor of composing the class 
song has fallen to her. 





Mary Alice Smith 
North Adams, Mass. 

"None but herself can be her parallel." 

If mingled qualities of sound judgment, ready wit, 
amiable and generous disposition beget success, we are 
not solicitous of her future. 



40 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Rachel Louise Smith "Rickie" 
Great Barrington, Mass. 

Class Play, The Fashion Plate, The Classiest Girl. 

"Tail and slender she walks in regal beauty 
Endowed with all the grace of womankind. 
But divinely human, a friend of untold worth, 
And a delightful playmate of joy and mirth." 



Lila C. Stannard "Tine" 
Mill River, Mass. 

"None knew her but to love her." 

Although she is a "Special" and has been with us 
only for a year, we are glad to have Lila as a member 
of '25. 

Did you ever know her to be without a story to sup- 
ply entertainment? 

Pink are her cheeks, and red her hair, 
A jollier girl you'll find nowhere. 




i 




May Tracy "Dodo" 

10 Stoddard Ave., 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Class President, Member of Glee Club, 
Junior Council Member, Class Play 

"With curly black hair and eyes of blue, 
We like her? You bet we do." 

By May's untiring efforts, the New York trip, which 
will provide many happy memories in future years, was 
accomplished. We are sure the days, "Dodo" spent at 
North Adams were all pleasant ones even if the week- 
ends in Pittsfield proved to be more attractive. 



THE NORMALOGUE 



41 




Margaret E. Trainor "Peg" 
Haydenville, Mass. 

Gym Captain, Class Play, Council 

"After the rain comes the sunshine." 

Peg, the merry Peg, the gay Peg, the moody maid of 
Normal. Her bright smiles lit with tears will remain 
with us through future years. 



May Ernestine Weber "Pete" 

51 Clark St., 

Easthampton, Mass. 

School Council, Class Play, Axis Staff 

"Her only fault is that she has no fault." 

Psychology, grammar, it matters not 

If May Weber is on the spot; 

For to our rescue, she always will try 

That in our classes we will surely get by 

Then, Hurrah for Weber! we'll shout with a will 

That we may in some way settle our bill. 








Catherine K. Welsh 
Lenox, Mass. 



'Kay" 



"Smile and the world smiles with you." 

Although Kay has always been quiet and demure 
while among us, we feel sure she will succeed because 
of her sunny disposition and resourcefulness. 



42 



THE NORMALOGUE 




Elizabeth Landers Welsh "Betty" 

Housatonic St., 

Lenox, Mass. 

You would think that she was quiet, 
You would know that she was wise, 
But it's easy to see the mischief 
In her sparkling brown eyes. 

Quietly and steadily, "Betty" has trodden the path 
which leads to her chosen profession. Never have we 
seen her anything but cheerful, and her happy smile 
will win her many friends wherever she goes. 



Charlotte F. Young 
Williamstown, Mass. 

Class Play 

"Her ways are ways of pleasantness, 
And all her paths are peace." 

Quiet, kind, sympathetic, loved and respected by 
all is Charlotte, and as a friend, no better can be found. 
Her faithfulness to duty combined with determination 
is bound to bring her success. 




THENORMALOGUE 43 



in ^Memory nf 

Alice Jeanton '25 

A Sunset Fancy 

To-nite as I sat at my window 

White the west was all agleam 

With that strange and wonderful splendor 

That is fleeting as a dream, 

I thought that the hands of angels' 

Had flung Heaven's gateway wide 

And I caught some glimpse of the glory 

From the hills on the other side. 

Is it not a comforting fancy 

This sunset thought of mine. 

That always the gates of Heaven, 

Swing open at day's decline — 

That those whose work is all ended, 

From our earthly woes and ills 

May pass to the peace and gladness 

That crown the beautiful hills. 



44 



THE NORMALOGUE 



Class Hag 

THURSDAY, JUNE EIGHTEENTH 



THE CALL AT 2 P. M. 

MORNING SONG— Massenet 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

MOONLIGHT MEADOWS— Czibulka 

ADDRESS TO JUNIORS 

RESPONSE 

CLASS SONG 

CLASS HISTORY 

SONGS— Creole Love Song— Smith 
Pirate Dreams — Huerter 

CLASS PROPHECY 

PIANO SOLO— Rustle of Spring— Sinding 

CLASS WILL 

IVY ORATION 

PLANTING OF THE IVY 

IVY SONG 

CLASS RECEPTION 

PROMENADE AT 8 P. M. 

SONG— Alma Mater 



Class of 1925 

May Tracy 

Class of 1925 

Mary on Cook 

Margaret Hutchins 

Katherine Slattery and Doris Chittim 

Anne Henderson 

Class of 1925 
Class of 1925 

A. Laurie MacGregor and Margaret Corkery 

K. Slattery 

May Weber and Lillia Sidney 

Beatrice Rowan 

May Tracy for '25, M. Hutchins for '26 

Class of 1925 

On the Green 

Normal Hall 

Class of 1925 



(Srafcuatton 



FRIDAY, JUNE NINETEENTH 



SONGS- 



Merry, Merry May — Huerter 
He Gave Me a Rose — Cadman 
Song of India — Rimsky-Korsakoff 

SCRIPTURE READING AND PRAYER 

SONGS 

ADDRESS 

CANTATA— Singing Leaves 

GIFT BY THE CLASS OF 1925 
PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

SINGING 

God Bless Our Native Land! 



Glee Club 



Rev. H. S. Metcalfe 

Mr. Pollard 

Ambrose L. Suhrie 

Glee Club 
Assisted by Mr. Pollard 

May Tracy 

Frank P. Morse 

John S. Dwight 



THENORMALOGUE 45 

Address of Wtlttimt 

IJARENTS, Teachers, Classmates, Friends: 

lr In every path that leads to success, there are so many rough places over which we 

must tread, so many obstacles which we must overcome that our destination sometimes seems 
beyond possibility of attainment. To-day, however, having triumphantly arrived at the 
first mile-stone in our journey, we are thankful for every effort that we have made as we have 
trudged along our chosen path together. But how far could all our efforts have carried us 
had there been no inspiration to guide us? 

Whenever our tasks have seemed too difficult, whenever we have experienced disap- 
pointments or discouragement, there has been ever before us one thought that, like a bright 
light shining in a dark way, has encouraged us to take heart again. What greater inspiration 
could there be than the thought of so many friends eager to share equally our pleasures and 
our trials, to laugh with us on the smooth way and to help us over the rough places? 

Just as you have so generously shared our troubles, we are happy to-day to share with 
you our feeling of satisfaction and joy at our progress toward success. 

During these two busy, happy years, we have learned to know and value one another. 
The friendships which we have formed within these walls will go on foreyer. Together we 
have played, and together, at opportunity's call, we have put our best effort into each task to 
be accomplished. 

This day does not mark an end; it marks only the beginning of a noble work. It marks 
the end of our journey together; henceforth each of us must walk alone on her chosen path 
— that path which must finally lead to only one destination — SUCCESS. 
"The little Road says Go; the little House says, Stay. 
And 0! it's bonny here at home, but I must go away. 
The little Road, like me, would seek and turn and know 
And forth I must to learn the things the little Road would show! 
And go I must, my dears, and journey while I may, 
Though heart be sore for the little House that had no word but Stay." 
But though each of us walks alone she will ever be guided by the ideals set by her Alma 
Mater. She will have always before her the realization of the great service she is rendering 
to mankind. Each of us is well equipped for such a service and each is firmly resolved to go 
forth willing and eager to cheer and help those with whom she is entrusted. 

Mr. Smith and Members of the Faculty, your interest in our welfare and your wise 
guidance during these two years have been in a great measure responsible for our present feel- 
ing of confidence in future service and success. We appreciate each sacrifice that you have 
made to send us out into the world ready and willing to do our part in our noble service. We 
shall never cease feeling thankful for our association with you and know that our work will 
prove greater because of it. 

Parents and Friends, it is not for us yet to fully express our appreciation for all that 
you have done for us. That time is to come. 

"I know that there are brook-gladdened meadows ahead 
And mountains of wearisome height, 
That the road passes on through the long afternoon 
And stretches away to the night." 
Yet we hope that as we climb ever upward you may be repaid in part by the knowledge 
that you have helped us to fulfill this resolution — to carry cheer into the big world and to 
render service to mankind. 

On this day, almost our last here together, we, the Class of '25, bid you welcome and 
hope that you may enjoy the program which we have planned. 

May M. Tracy 
President of Class of '25 



46 THENORMALOGUE 



A&fcreas to 3Jmttnrs 



3F1EAR Juniors, worthy classmates and friends: 

^ Altho it is my great privilege to address you this afternoon, yet I do it with sorrow 

in my heart because, are we not leaving our Alma Mater tomorrow, for, 

"There is a quest that calls us, 

In nights when we're alone, 

The need to ride where the ways divide 

The known from the unknown." 

However, it is my duty to put sorrowing thoughts aside and give to you certain pieces 
of advice. Let me add that these suggestions come from those who have had two years of 
experience in our Normal and we offer them for the benefit of each person who will become a 
Senior next year. 

My first bit of counsel will be to the class as a whole. 

On returning here next September try to conduct yourselves as we have been con- 
ducting ourselves throughout the year. Befriend the lonely little Juniors when they appear 
in your presence. Strive to keep the spirit of friendship as true and pure as it should be in 
any place. 

Four times every week you will assemble with Mr. Smith, (sometimes without him) 
in Psychology. Be prepared to contribute all kinds of concrete examples, but remember that 
you are only little amoebas. 

Twice during the week, you will have Mr. Carpenter, so remember this, "always read 
every word of your reference work and make full notes on each for Management class. 

It will be well to advise you that the handling of worms, bugs and flies is very necessary 
in the Zoology course, so try to be as brave as we were during that time. 

Altho Miss Owens has been newly appointed to our beloved faculty as teacher of His- 
tory of Education, we must leave a word with you about her class. In this subject we were 
really taught how to study, and also how to find the choice parts of our reading matter. Never 
fail to do as you are told. 

We all know that you will spend a happy year with Miss Baright, but girls, here's a 
secret. You would better read many poems and short stories, for no matter what you men- 
tion, this well-read teacher has either read or heard of it. 

Since as Seniors, you will have Miss Pearson only half a year, be sure that you make 
the most of that short time to understand harmony, unity and rhythm of design. 

You will be entirely deprived of Mr. Cummings' jolly smile, but we hope that soon 
a new course will be started with this teacher at its head. 

A word must be said about our famous man dances. According to the old saying, "slow 
and steady win the race," maybe by next year you will have grown up sufficiently to dance 
until morning, altho we warn you that if this is to be accomplished, you must have a great 
deal of "stick-to-a-tive-ness." As you already know, music hath charms, and 
"Some think the world was made for fun and frolic — and so do I." 

Now, may I give some advice to the "dorm" girls? Why, of course they need it! 

Always obey every house rule, if you can remember; also have the fire drill directions 
tacked on your wall because of the constant need of them. 

Even if the House meetings are rare, attend them regularly and pay strict attention to 
all things said or done. 

We hope by next year that everyone's tongue will have loosened sufficiently for you to 
be able to converse readily with the head of your table. Do not wait until the week end to 
do your talking. It causes too much disturbance. 

Remember, study hours are for study, not for free vaudeville shows or races in the 
corridor. 

When bells ring for meals, do not rush madly down stairs as if you had never seen food 
before. 



THENORMALOGUE 47 

While waiting for your escort to come, on the night of a man dance, do not drape your- 
selves over the bannister, watching others come to their doom. It is not being done. 

Last but not least, do not try to cross Mrs. Van., for you know that, "even if she speak- 
eth not, yet there is conversation in her eyes." 

There is much more advice which might be given to you before the final good-byes, but 
what has been said must be kept well in mind, never to be forgotten. 

At last, my dear friends of a year, it is time to bid farewell; to leave you to work out 
your own salvation, or shall I say destruction? All that we ask, is that you support the high- 
est standards possible and graduate next June with flying colors, 

In the world's broad field of battle, 
In the bivouac of life, 
Be not like dumb, driven, cattle! 
Be a hero in the strife! 

Maryon H. Cook, '25 






iRrspcutsr to ti}t ^triors 

.ENIORS: 

Being by nature a most obliging and ambitious class, we accept these your parting 
words of advice and good counsel. Now, as ever, we acknowledge your good judgment. Who 
is more qualified to instruct and guide than the class which has travelled the path upon which 
our feet are set? 

Ever since we arrived in Normal Hall to occupy the seats which you so thoughtfully 
reserved for our use, we have felt the kindly, helpful spirit of your class. What is meant to 
us in those first strange days, only one who has experienced our "newness" can understand. 
Had we tried at that time to voice the depth of our gratitude, the words would have but poorly 
expressed our sincere appreciation. Even now we can express it all too inadequately. May 
we, who have known this welcomed friendliness, follow your fine example and carry it next 
September to the class of 1927. 

During our busy school days, overflowing with work and countless pleasures, we have 
come to know one another well. As a class, we have been humbled by your athletic prowess, 
amazed at your mental activities; and inspired by your dignity and self possession. If, on 
certain occasions, we have felt it necessary to display the possibilities of the Junior class, it 
was to test our ability to measure up to the standards set by you for us to follow. 

We will miss you when we return in the fall, yet you are leaving with us lasting im- 
pressions, firm friendships and pleasant memories. 

We wish you the success and happiness which is your due. 

M. Hutchins, '26 






48 THENORMALOGUE 



Blnrits to tlje Class ^mtg 



Pride of the Berkshires, 

Our Alma Mater. 
We shout our glad cheers, 

O'er hills far and near. 

Chorus 

Alma Mater, N. A. N. S. 

Praise to thee 
We love thee best, 

Where'er we roam. 
Alma Mater, praise to thee! 



Praise to the noblest, 

The fairest, our Normal. 

We hold thee our dearest, 
Forever our own. 



Chorus 



Words by Doris Chittim y 25 
Music by Katherine Slattery '25 



®o ti\t Colors ai '25 

Here's to the colors of '25 
As they proudly float beneath the sky! 

In every class at N. A. N. S. 
Seniors have proven to be the best! 

Our dear class colors, Scarlet and Gray 
We'll ever serve most faithfully. 
For one and all in your future life 
May the memories of Normal, help win the strife. 



Katherine Crowley, '25 



THENORMALOGUE 49 

Class -History 1924-25 

"Turn backward, turn backward, Time, on thy way, 
Bring back happy memories just for today." 

jHALL we ever forget the eventful day when first our timid feet made their hesitating way 
to the assembly hall of the North Adams' Normal School? No! Because that day 
marked a turning point in our lives. We had commenced the wonderful training in the study 
of the child, that would enable us to become one of those beloved beings, a teacher. More 
than once during our first day, we felt the appraising eyes of the learned Seniors fixed upon 
us. Would they like us? However, when the Senior reception was held for the Juniors, there 
was no doubt left in our hearts. How friendly they were to us! Then and there were formed 
such friendships as would last far longer than the period spent at N. A. N. S. 

During that year what a myriad of events took place! The Hallowe'en party with one 
of those eerie ghost stories told as only Miss Baright is capable of telling them; the four "man" 
dances with the trials and tribulations of securing a "man"; — most of the girls will agree with 
me that this was a case of "if at first you don't succeed, try, try again" — and the "Faculty 
Show" wherein our beloved teachers displayed their talents, were among the most enjoyable. 
There was also the exhibition which the Seniors gave in the gymnasium. Did we Juniors 
mind that we were the subjects of their experimentation? Certainly not! We were proud 
of them and their executive ability. Of course we enthusiastically attended the Glee Club 
Concert "The Last Tea of Suki," or those who were more fortunate participated in it; the 
Senior Play, "Thesus", and the Operetta Patricia in which our upper classmates excelled. 
All too soon came graduation week with the Alumni Banquet at which we Juniors served, the 
Class Day exercises, and the long anticipated Reception to the Seniors. How attractive the 
girls were in their fluffy, vivid dresses! We felt well repaid for our efforts expended in their 
behalf. Finally came the day of graduation itself. Songs, speeches, distribution of diplomas 
and our Seniors were gone forever, — but we, we had become exalted enough to fill their places 
We had become the Seniors! 

Vacation days were soon over, so once more we returned to the "school upon the hill." 
There as Seniors we welcomed the entering Juniors with open arms, even as we had been re- 
ceived. Now our shoulders were not as lightly burdened as in our Junior year, for now we 
were actually teaching for long periods of time in the helpful training schools. Neverthe- 
less, we found time to take charge of the "man"-dances! To the new Juniors belonged the 
arduous task of removing the desks, under the able direction of Mr. Jones, to make space in 
the assembly hall for the dancers. A new factor entered into our experience. We must 
have money. Our class gift, the trip to New York, and the upkeep of the School Paper "the 
Axis" each required this, therefore, to this end, we held food sales, blind auctions, card parties, 
and other money making enterprises. 

. How successful was our class play! We little dreamed of the remarkable talent hidden 
in our midst, until Miss Baright selected the memorable characters in "Hiawatha". 

One disappointment came to the class, for we, the incomparable Seniors, were outsung 
in a musical contest by the Juniors. But the songsters of both classes are to be heartily con- 
gratulated upon their efforts under the able leadership of their chosen directors. 

At last graduation week has again arrived with its Class Day, Senior Banquet and 
graduation, as well as the reception at which we are to be the guests. Our glorious school 
days are at an end, and we are prepared to go forth into the world to instill in the hearts of 
others the wisdom we have gained. 

We are sorry to leave a place that has so endeared itself to us, yet we are glad that one 
more stepping stone in our upward struggle has been passed. We leave our Alma Mater 
with the fervent prayer on our lips and in our hearts that we may continue to uphold her noble 
traditions and make her proud that once her spacious halls have sheltered us. 

"All Hail to Thee Our Alma Mater!" 

Anne Peat Henderson 



50 THENORMALOGUE 

Class -proper}} 

/7[HIS dark, gloomy night, as I sit in my easy chair before a roaring fire, gazing dreamingly 
^ at the brilliant sparks which crack and leap into the air, my eyes fall lovingly on a book 
which I have been so fully perusing. The cover bears the old familiar monogram, N. A. 
N. S. with those two beloved numerals '25. How glad I am to be the proud possessor of that 
treasured book, printed twenty years ago, but which recalls to my mind loved places and fond 
recollections of my class-mates at Normal School. 

Rather abashed, I am forced to admit that there are a few strands of silver among my 
once brown hair. Only Old Father Time, who constantly touches my locks with his gnarled 
fingers, has wrought this change. But Time works magically, too. As it advances, it leaves 
in our mind, many vivid memories of unforgotten days. How happy I was then, living in 
the midst of a wealth of comrades and beloved friends! 

Suddenly, my attention is attracted by the terrific storm which is raging outside in 
the pitch-blackness of the evening. The moaning wind is shaking the very foundation of 
the house. The moon is entirely overshadowed by ugly, black clouds. Thor, in all the hor- 
ror of his majesty, is exhibiting his strength in tumultuous peals of thunder. At frequent 
intervals, sharp flashes of lightning flood the night. Then, all is instantly black again. To 
me, there is always something so entrancing about a weird scene. It haunts one — yet the 
very gruesomeness of it holds an attraction for me. Speechless, I tiptoe to the door. With 
a lingering step, I tread the narrow, gravel path. My, how it crunches! With determined 
heart, I step forth. Unguided, my feet follow a well-known path, which winds aimlessly amid 
the grove of sighing pine trees. 

There, under the branches of an outstretched pine, I can just make out a dark figure. 
What is its mission in this lonesome place, at such a bewitching hour of the night? Stealth- 
fully, I creep closer, and when within a few feet of it, I stop and lean against the rough bark 
of an old tree. From here, as the storm dies away and in the east the grey dawn comes forth, 
I watch her — for it is a woman garbed in flowing robes of dusky material — as she gathers a 
few sticks of wood and builds a fire under a great, black caldron, which suddenly looms before 
ner. As with a slender pole, and slow easy motions, she stirs the contents of the vessel, a 
cloud of fumes rises from the seething mass. To my amazement they are taking definite 
shapes! Somehow, I seem to recognize, — yes, Ruth Holden! 

"Oh tell me quickly," I inquire, "What is Rufus doing?" 

In a slow monotonous drawl, the figure says, "You know way back in Normal School 
days, Ruth was interested in the subject of Alexander. They say that after marrying him 
she now has sufficient local color to write her book, 'the Capture of Alexander'." 

Again, as the fumes trail upward, a form in the shape of a maiden, lingers in the tree- 
tops. "Do you allow her to stay up there?" I asked. "Won't she fall?" 

"No, indeed," the witch replied, "that is Hazel Perkins, a girl of so much experience, 
that I can trust her anywhere." 

Being anxious to hear more about old acquaintances, I am too impatient to wait for 
the mists to rise. So, the crone invites me to gaze into the depth of the boiling liquid. Here, 
I see a figure of an old, old woman, whose front teeth do not meet, who is teaching school — 
very successfully, I believe. Kay Crowley? To be sure! In Normal, she was one of our 
younger class-mates." By the way she is handling those children, she surely has the knack 
of discipline." 

Now, there is an apparently intelligent woman earnestly debating her cause. Ah! 
now it is growing clearer. As governor of the state of New York, she is conscientiously nomi- 
nating another woman of exceedingly, pleasing and influential character plus high social rating 
for president of the United States, namely May Weber. And who is the debater? Why 
Lura Lamb, of course. Didn't she show her ability back in those Normal days, for her present, 
career? And here's a petite and charming young miss, silently sanctioning this movement. 
You understand how deeply she feels the importance of this election, because she is an ardent 



THE NORMALOGUE 



51 



supporter of Uncle SAM. Right away, I know it must be Dot Shaw. Ah now, I see someone 
actually sacrificing some of her beauty for others. I can't seem to think who it can be, but 
as I look again, I recognize Bee Kerr cutting her hair to make switches for the poor unfortu- 
nates who once bobbed their flowing tresses. "I sincerely hope this is the only cause to which 
she will ply her switches," muttered the witch. 

Now, I hear clearly in the distance, a sweet voice trilling. Without any questioning 
the witch said, "That is Doris Chittim, who is singing as soloist in yonder Temple, with Kath- 
erine Slattery, as the organist." 

Suddenly, a long finger is pointed to a group of people. Dressed in artist's garb, I 
can distinguish two youthful figures, cleverly plying their brushes. "Do I know them? Yes, 
indeed." They are no other than Lillia Sidney and Antoinette Murray whose widely known 
artistic works have made them famous. "Whom have they for a model?" I ask. The old 
woman replies, "I can't think of her name, but she was the most lovable member of the class 
of '25." In a minute, I know it to be Eleanor Sisson, who was also chosen as the sweetest 
one among us, back in those dear old Normal days. 

Now, I see a garden, where a young lady is carefully guarding her wealth of growing 
flowers. The witch is puzzled as to her name. But, who could be mistaken? It is Mabelle 
Potter, the famous naturalist, who recently added much to the florist's world, by crossing a 
skunk cabbage with a sweet pea. However, there are some turkeys that persist in uprooting 
her choice specimens. I heard rumors that they belonged to a woman, whose ability along 
the line of raising turkeys is unsurpassed Linda Howlett, is her name. 

Ethel Hemenway, who is a sympathetic friend of Belle's, has even gone so far as to 
offer Linda a "Halfpenny" if she will keep her turkeys at home. But it is of no avail. 

Now, away over to the left, I behold an immense amphitheatre where gigantic trees 
with their dark green foliage form a picturesque background. Many people are rehearsing 
for the play, "All Over Nothing at All", which is to be given this evening. How I wish I 
knew who are to take part in the play! Just then Yvonne Cayer passed a program, and 
the old witch said that she had built up a "rattling" good business, issuing programs. Im- 
mediately, I ask her who printed them. 

"She employs Veronica Loftus, who in her High School days won a medal for type- 
writing, to do all the printing," the witch replied. As the program comes into view, I glance 
at the list of players, and my eye falls on the leading lady's name — Miss May Tracy, whose 
popularity in N. A. N. S. has evidently followed her to these later years. As a matter of fact, 
I seem to know all this famous production. 



LIST OF CHARACTERS 



Mother 

Father 

Children 


Olive Doolittle 
Martha Illingworth 
Peg Corkery 
Emma Langer 
Flossie Cromack 


Nursemaid 


Anne Henderson 
Harriet Couch 


Grown-up Sister 


Gert. Scheffer 


Spendthrift 


Olive Owen 


Shoemaker 


Ethel Kaplan 



Who smiles upon her helpless children; 

Whose job is to drive a "water-wagon"; 

The boisterous terror of her mother's heart; 

Peg's twin sister with very similar traits; 

The glow from her tresses makes her mother's 

little comfort; 

Tom-boy, always exhibiting her athletic ability; 

She is getting her training for future use in an 

Orphan Asylum; 

With her beauty, she has aspired to stardom in 

the movies; 

Who has purchased a rare Arabian horse from 

the sheik of "M. Aggie", to whom it is rumored 

she is engaged; 

We suspected her love of "boots" in Reading 

Class; 



52 



THE NORMALOGUE 



Politician 



Mary Smith 



Cosmopolitan 



Bobbed Hair Bandits 



Anna Rachdorf 



Rhoda Pratt 
Charlotte Young. 



Who led "mother" from her household tasks to 
a campaign against "Pa Rachdorf"; 
After a trip abroad, to satisfy her desire for 
"antiquated things", she is "home again" ar- 
ranging a campaign against European Honey- 
moons; 

Who destroyed all the family music, among 
which was the "Ugidy Ug" Indian dance. We 
always suspected their evil intents back in 
N. A. N. S. 

Altho the proud possessor of a frat pin, she is 
wondering if her "life must always consist in 
these things." 
Note: — To Miss Lila Stannard, we owe many thanks in arranging the snow scene. The var- 
ious tinted hues of falling snow were fetching, because of their uniqueness. 

With a start, I am aroused. "Where have I been?" Why, right here, in my favorite 
chair, in front of the fire, but my thoughts have wandered many miles away. It is growing 
late, and the fire sinks lower and lower on the hearth. "The embers of our lives have been 
brightened by the thoughts of our old friends, as by a dying spurt of flame". As I look again, 
the fire has finally died away. 

A. Laurie MacGregor, '25 



The School Teacher Betty Floyd 



CLASS PROPHECY— (continued) 
AlNCE my days at Normal, I have frequently thought of my classmates, but recently more 
^ than ever, I could imagine them advanced in years, with all their success and achieve- 
ments crowned with glory. 

Oft as I have gazed at a sparkling fountain, dashing its drops up into the air, only to 
drop slowly at my feet, I would say, "Oh, that you could tell me of my friends so dear!" But 
it seemed not to notice my presence there. Sometimes as I sat by my open fire with my old 
Normalogue in my hand, my mind would wander away to those happy Normal days. 

One evening, I was thus idly musing before my fading fire, when I heard a sharp knock 
at my door, and there entered my study, in answer to my call, a young Chinaman. Who was 
he? Why had he come? All these questions were going through my mind as I gazed at him. 

In my conversation with him, I found that his name was Sou-Sin, one of the great 
magic sand readers of China. Now, was my chance. I asked him to read the sands for me. 
To this, he agreed. 

He opened a large case and took out his frame, the brown sand, and the magic wand. 
With the freest of movements he swung his wand over the sands. They seemed to change 
magicly into a mirror, then a picture. I could see a large hall decorated with Spring Symbols 
and all the gayety of youth. Soon people began to enter the room. As the clock struck eight, 
an orchestra started to play and the dancing master came into view. To my surprise it was 
a dancing mistress, whom I recognized as Gladys Campbell. Since her days at Normal, she 
had made a great success teaching the art of dancing. Her classes were for geniuses only, so 
it was not surprising for me to find "Peg" Rockwood here taking Professional Toe Dancing. 

Quick as a flash, the sands came back and the picture faded away, but again as quickly 
another came, and I was shown a large department store in New York. Here I could see the 
extensive exhibition rooms with their beautiful gowns. The model who stood out foremost 
was none other than Rachel Smith. These costumes which she was displaying were for the 
wife of the editor of the most successful New York newspaper. Who was it? — again I looked 
— to be sure! Isabelle Barber! 

Though the scene changed again, it did not leave New York. Now I could see before 
me pillars of the Federal Reserve Bank. The employees were standing at the door waiting 



THENORMALOGUE 53 

for the one belated. A Chrysler Roadster rolled up, and I recognized the late arrival as Marge 
Boyle, now Treasurer of the Federal Reserve Bank. 

Another wave of the wand, and I was transported to a small Scientific laboratory where 
I could see "Bea" Rowan, who had just succeeded in making Protoplasm. She became over- 
interested in Psychology while in Normal and has since tried many experiments in which she 
has been successful. 

Directly across the street, I noticed a sign-board telling me of Miss Cohen's success as 
an Elocutionist. To be sure, we knew she would do wonders in this line after her work at 
Normal. 

With another glance, I could see Mary Gunning who is now Matron of a girls' private 
school. She was looking over the "Normalogue" and comparing it with the new year-book 
which had just been handed to her. 

With the graceful sweep of the magic wand, the picture was gone, and I gazed at the 
brown sands again. With another sweep, I was at the other end of our country, California! 
Hollywood! A big sign advertising a new picture with an all star cast caught my eye — "Dar- 
ing Damsels." Among these characters were Ruth Dunn, Hester Farley, and Kay Kiely. 
To my great amazement, I found that Maryon Cook also had been travelling with these girls 
and is now a professional at making up people. 

Also here in Hollywood, although her husband is a butcher, I found that Ellen Dinneen 
was head of the Secret Service Bureau of California. 

Now we left our own United States, and lo! before me loomed the Andes of South Amer- 
ica. Here on the side of the mountain, I saw the Andes Inn which I later found out was owned 
and managed by "Barb" Beebe. A big car drove up to the Inn and I recognized the two 
Welch sisters. They have beccme professional globe trotters and were touring the world. 
Eleanor Hickey had been a member of the party, but on reaching Panama she met one of her 
numerous old acquaintances and remained there. 

Oh, in these far off countries, were there more of my classmates? Yes, and without 
delay the scene was changed to distant India where I found Persis Andrews, Anne Kennedy 
and Agnes Jackson doing Missionary work. "Perk" was teaching Geography with the newest 
Geography book, "Men Elsewhere", by Leona Bachinski. Agnes Jackson was the district 
Doctor and Anne Kennedy her assistant nurse. 

The picture changed again an there was Alice O'Brien, standing in the midst of a throng 
of people, talking about the new Psychology book in which many problems of the subject are 
solved, among which is the complete definition of Memory. It was not surprising to find 
that the author of this volume was Julia Martin. 

But, alas! how quickly that scene faded from my sight! Soon I seemed to be in a large 
auditorium in Chicago, where many people were gathered. As the clock struck the hour, 
the chairman introduced to the audience the World's most fmous Impersonator, Miss Vera 
Dunn. Between the acts, Rose Larkin pleased the people very much with her charming so- 
prano voice. She had become famous as a soloist and now these two were travelling together. 

Here in Chicago, we find Peg Trainor too, running a Teachers' Agency which seemed 
to be prospering marvellously. 

Quick as a flash, my eyes were transported to our National Capitol. Here in Washing- 
ton is Maie Ryan, now President of the "Women's National Sportsman's Club." Maie has 
made a success in this position and has been of great service to American women everywhere. 
I can now see Maie talking to Antone Janick, in her office in the Pan American Building. 
Antone has been successful in all her "undertakings" and in "curling" all her ideas to help 
others. Now she is Secretary of our Foreign Affairs. 

Mary Fenton is also in Washington. I beheld her leaving the Capitol, where she had 
just spoken before the Senate for more peaceful conditions among the Hardware Dealers of 
the United States. 

The wand swept over the sand once more and I almost lost the vision, but again it 
changed. I could see the Corcoran Art Gallery where a new picture, a master piece, had re- 
cently been hung. As I gazed at it, I knew the face was familiar. Annette? yes, Annette 



54 



THE NORMALOGUE 



O'Neil who had become an artist's model, a famous one, too, to be sure. This picture had 
been commented upon by expert critics, but they were unable to find any flaw. Here, at 
this minute was "Chick" Fitzgerald, the most prominent of America's art critics standing before 
the picture. 

. It was nearing time for presidential election and "Chick" said that Helen Pendergast 
was going out into different states making speeches in praise of her candidate for the president. 

Another transformation, and before my eyes were only the brown sands. Oh, you must 
go on! I have not seen all yet. The mirror came again and another picture. Why, my 
dear Alma Mater, N. A. N. S. Here on the Faculty platform sat a member of our class, Anne 
Fitzgerald, the handwork instructor. 

Now I can see the "Normalogue" 1925, and as the vision altered, the book changed to 
the Atlantic Monthly. Then Laurie MacGregor appeared. Oh, I could understand it well. 
Because of her great work at Normal, in connection with the "Axis" she had gone into the 
publishing business and steadily advanced to the editorship of this magazine. 

With a smile, and a tear in my eye, I gazed at the picture, but it was gone — gone and 
the sands alone lay before me. Gazing steadily at them, I mused. How happy I was now! 
I knew about all my classmates, where they were, and what they were doing. I looked up 
for Sau-Sin, but where was he? He had vanished, magic sands and all. But, no matter. 
With a heart full of happiness, I leaned back in my easy chair to dream of the joyous past 
which had just been brought so vividly to my mind. 

Margaret M. Corkery, '25 



* 



I he Lshmomon's dc// n t~tl o n 

of a Teacher /s o fmosT 
pa/n ~fu//u correct^ 



-% 



if 



/ eac/?er Teac/?ee 
F///ee c/ay 7o/rfee , 

{f//ee n/'ohf /nvr/fee- 

/ja/?ers 
/Verges o// Crafeee t 

A^o orte. Auoee 

A/o one /f/5see , 
/-^oor c/cY ' r?7Q/</ee. 
A^o one /cyee ' 



% w 




THE NORMA LOGUE 



55 



/UMA HATER 



0*r1K| +\. J^ai^ 



i<7J*/ 



I 

J g - in 




» Hi a; . =; 



v • rt »i 






1 » L J* ^- 




31 



ru 



«|<J«d ta^vds. &Uri 



•** •** vtre^ 



S tv » ^5cjr^4ew 




^ Our dcdrAU*^t^ vte-n<U . Prane. !• i-^«« 




pu, Al-,a MaW *~+ « * *£** 1***1 %I S f ° * 

t j*L 1 



J ^ov|aW\| tt> *Vt*e deor t\J*m* I, Wei c « r Wa Us 




*»Hv fc^ti ri *cj 



56 
<1 



THE NORMALOGUE 





IJJjtE, THE Class of 1925, being of unsound mind and body and unconscious of approaching 
^^ dissolution, do make this to be our last will and testament. We bequeath: 
To our dear Faculty: 

Our appreciation of their untiring efforts in our behalf. 
To Mr. Smith: 

A collection of trained amoebae and paramoecia to be used for demonstrations with 
the Class of '26. 
To Miss Baright: 

A package of needles that she may never lose her points. 

Also a cut-glass soup tureen in which to collect the "ands" and "buts" of the oral com- 
position classes. 
To Miss Perason: 

A new supply of discriminating judgment intermixed with harmonious values to re- 
place that which we have exhausted. 
To Miss Skeele: 

A mammoth spool containing one thousand "lines of thought" in order that she may 
always have a "question on her mind". 
To Miss Shole§: 

A globe, with special emphasis on the sea (C) hemisphere which our report cards can 
testify is her favorite zone. 
To Miss Perry: 

All we know about the ensemble of the pedagogical, psychological, associative steps 
in rote song teaching. (Note: We felt that our excess knowledge would be of value to the 
Class of '26). 
To Miss Owens: 

A Ipud speaker with which to tune in on the spiritual world to obtain first hand infor- 
mation from the ancient educators. (Note: This bequest we thought appropriate because 
it will prevent an attack of scoliosis caused by the weight of the ponderous volumes written 
by the old masters). 
To Mr. Carpenter: 

Our class book of jokes. (After reading these, he will need an unusually strong tele- 
scope to aid him to recognize as teachers the members of the Class of '25.) 
To Mr. Venable: 

A zoo located on the Normal campus containing a bountiful supply of grasshoppers, 
crickets, et cetera which he may tame in his spare moments that they may be more easily 
studied. 
To Mr. Cummings: 

A dumb waiter to be used in traveling to and from morning exercises. 
To Miss Jenkins: 

Personal aeroplane service which will enable her to visit us all in our respective rural 
schools. 
To Miss Donelson: 

A finger-printing device to be used in her work as library detective. 



THENORMALOGUE 57 

To Miss Ferguson: 

The Seven League Boots to be employed in answering telephone calls. 
To Miss Allyn: 

A negro double who may conveniently do all "neo-styling" without the resulting damage 
to her hands. 
To our Training-School Teachers: 

The abecedarians' new alphabet book, the A's dominating, with accompanying ink pad 
and stamp. 
To Mrs. Van: 

Another thousand crates of macaroni, numberless barrels of apples, two tons of cheese, 
and one hundred hogsheads of New York baked beans to replace those we have devoured 
this year. 
To Mrs. Gellis: 

A picture frame ten feet long and five feet wide, containing various pictures of "Patsy." 
To Mr. Jones: 

A box of sunshine biscuits. 
To the Class of 1926 we leave these various phenomena: 

Our unusual reputation. 

A soundless piano to be devoted to the practice of their harmonious music lessons. 

Our permission for one o'clock man dances. 

Our gymnastic prowess that they may rise as did we in Miss Skeele's estimation. 
To Alice Michelson, Elizabeth Rhoades, Evelyn Hunter, Margaret Stanton, and Florence 
Bates: 

Ruth Holden's famous book "How to be Healthy though Thin." 
To Grace Lamb, Wenonah Webb, and Eleanor Swann: 

Emma Langer's "talkativeness." (These young ladies are far too retiring for school 
marms.) 
To Millie Dansereau: 

Eleanor Sisson's famous poem "How to Keep Your Equilibrium under Icy Circum- 
stances." 
To "Frankie" Drury: 

A lock of "Dot" Chittim's hair to keep her company in the long years to come. 
To Sally Fillebrown and Ruth Calderwood: 

Agnes Jackson's "gift of gab." (Agnes found hers especially valuable at meal time, 
girls. ) 
To Gwen Damon: 

A twenty volume set of references entitled "How? Why? Where? When? Who? 
What?" 
To Louise Chicoine and Earline Lawrence: 

Ethel and Anna's telephone calls. 
To Angy Goodall: 

Ruth-Dunn's "drink to me only with thine eyes" look. 
To Edith Herrick, Theresa Nolan, and Hilda McDonough: 

The many "dromedaries" of Peg Corkery and her coterie. 
To Jessie Brickhill: 

A little "polar bear" skin. 
To Hazel Connor, Marcia Church, Grace Bitzer, and Vera Sears: 

Kay Crowley's painless recipe "How to Grow Tall and Willowy in a Day." 
To Mary Sylvia, Marion Morganson, Mary Dahowski, and Ruth Nagle: 

Flossie Cromack's reputation as a modern Mrs. Tom Thumb. 
To Helen Moody, Lyndal Cranson, and Marion Temple: 

Helen Pendergast's quiet ways. (These girls have been entirely too noisy this past 
year.) 



58 THENORMALOGUE 

To Florence Moore: 

Laurie MacGregor's ability to grow long hair over night. 
To Helen Dowling: 

The chance to be a future Peter Pan. 
To Isabelle Flaherty: 

A class of juniors to mother. 
To Esther Morgan: 

Our hope that she may be Sousa's right hand man. 
To Marion Ryan and Dot Bruton: 

Annette and Gert's movie possibilities. 
To Julia Sandberg: 

The position of spokesman for all unmarked trunks. 
To Florence Hunt: 

Perkie's little appetite. 
To Helen Haig, Ada McSweeney, and Viola Lesure: 

The "Welchies" week-end trips. 
To those town girls with whose pet characteristics we are unfortunately not so familiar: 

A well-equipped cafeteria. 

A chance to earn that ten dollars. 

A private bus-line. 

In witness thereof, we do this day set our hand and seal on the eighteenth day of June 
in the Year of Our Lord, Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-Five. 

Signed, 

The Class of 1925 
Witnesses: 

Dormitory Clock 

School Bells 

Mark Hopkins Tower 

The swearing was omitted at the request of certain teachers who are constitutionally 
opposed to profanity. 

Lillia Franklin Sidney, '25 and May Ernestine Weber, '25 



THENORMALOGUE 59 

ihig Oration 

TilOR TWO years we have studied within these ivy-covered walls, preparing ourselves for 
the day when we might take our place as the workers and dreamers of the world. Now 
that day has come and in token of our readiness, we have gathered here to give a new well- 
spring to the ivy life of our school. 

This little plant is symbolic of life and youth. Small and far outclipsed by its brothers 
which tower above it, it still has in its tiny greenness that divine spark — the essence of life. 
Today standing vibrant with life, it faces two alternatives. It may continue to grow upward, 
weathering all the adversities of nature until at last it has increased the loveliness of the 
whole and we exclaim in wonderment: 

"A vine — 
A clinging vine 
Round brick close to entwine 
Stedfast and growing still 
Our hearts with memory to refill. 
It stayed— it held." 
Or the sun may beat too strongly upon it and the rain fall too heavily until the ivy relinquishes 
its struggle and perishes. 

So lie the two ways before us! As the teachers of tomorrow we are stepping into a 
land of much opportunity for service. We are greatly needed — little children need us. What 
a blessed inspiration this is to encourage and strengthen us on our way. Well might our 
motto be, 

"Non ministrandum sed ministrare". 
With us there must be no alternative. We cannot fail these children. Let us then 
give unselfishly of our lives and service to the end that we maybe counted among the laborers 
in the vineyard. Then shall we always remember that there is much work to do and learn to 
say: 

"Let me but do my work from day to day, 
In field or forest, at the desk or loom, 
In roaring market-place or tranquil room; 
Let me but find it in my heart to say, 
When vagrant wishes beckon me astray, 
This is my work, my blessing, not my doom; 
Of all who live, I am the one by whom 
This work can best be done in the right way." 

Beatrice M. Rowan, '25 



Yonder springeth our ivy vine small, 
Just as our lives, to rise or to fall; 
With tendrils of hope it clings to the base, 
And wilts to the ground in adversity's face. 

The joy of new birth springs up with its leaves; 
The hope of new life comes borne on the breeze; 
We'll breathe of its essence, quaff deep of its joys, 
And hide from the world our cares and annoys. 

Ah! You in your verdure and you in your hope, 

Give the gold of your joy with our sorrow to cope; 

Lift upward your head; lift upward ours too; 

Cling closely to life; look up to the true; 

Live onward and forward though many the years 

Since we placed you, and left you with sad parting tears. 

Eleanor Sisson, '25 



UramattcB 



4 4 



Hiawatha 



?? 




62 



THE NORMALOGUE 



Characters in "Utauiatlja" 






Hiawatha, the Boy- 
Hiawatha, the man 
Minnehaha 
Nokomis 
Gitche Manito 
Pau-Pau-Keewis 
Chibiabos 
Iagoo 
Mondamin 
The Arrow Maker 
Bukadawin — Famine 
Ahkosewin — Fever 
The Priest 
His Guide 
His Companion 
Braves 



Maidens 



Margaret Rockwood 
Mabelle Floyd 
Doris Chittim 
Yvonne Cayer 
Olive Doolittle 
Gladys Campbell 
Annette O'Neil 
Linda Howlett 
Flossie Cromack 
Margaret Corkery 
Leona Bachinski 
Isabelle Barber 
Ellen Dinneen 
Margaret Trainor 
Mary Fenton 
Cecelia Fitzgerald 
Laurie Macgregor 
Charlotte Young 
Ruth Dunn 
Rachel Smith 
Anna Rachdorf 
Mae Ryon 
Rhoda Pratt 
Anne Henderson 
Katherine Crowley 
Mae Weber 
Hester Farley 
Mae Tracy- 
Beatrice Rowan 
Dorothy Shaw 
Bertha Kerr 






THENORMALOGUE 63 

THE PREPARATIONS 

JJllAVE you a pair of shears I may borrow? Red's wig is too long." 

^* It was seven o'clock on the uproarious night of the Senior Play, "Hiawatha." 

From any place in the dormitory, a listener might have heard peals of nervous laughter, ming- 
led with awesome groans and sighs as the Seniors donned their regalia. Occasionally a little 
louder scream would pierce the air, when an over-zealous Junior forced a pin too far into some 
Senior's costume. 

At about seven-fifteen, the tumult reached its height, when hurrying feet went racing 
down the halls for some last important article. Doors slammed loudly, as the Seniors, in 
their strange costumes, made their way across the yard. 

Shortly after seven-thirty, the leaders of a constant stream of girls left the dormitory 
for the scene of the play. The others, talking in high, excited tones, followed by threes and 
lours. 

Before eight o'clock the last of the girls had been ushered to her place in the audience. 

Now, the dormitory, where, a few moments before, bedlam had reigned, heaved a deep 
sigh of relief, as it tenderly felt its beams and ceilings to see that nothing was irreparably in- 
jured. Then it settled down to a few moments of peace, broken only by the soft scampering 
of mice, who ventured from their hiding places to investigate the waste baskets left behind. 

M. G. C, '26 



A SETTING 
/7THROUGH the branches of many, feathery evergreens, one caught a glimpse of blue sky 
^ and still bluer water. Under these fragrant boughs, to the right of a little clearing, was 
pitched a curiously-decorated, brown wigwam, on one side of which was hung an impressive 
black, bear skin. Extending from the roots of the trees to the opposite edge of the cleared 
space was an effective green covering. A large, brown log and the stump of a tree, placed 
on opposite sides added to the effectiveness of the scene. Every detail of this primitive set- 
ting was in charming contrast as the brown hangings were drawn aside to disclose the repro- 
duction of the home of little Hiawatha. 

M. H., '26 



% 



THE PLAY 

IAWATHA" . How much more that name means to us! Before this play 

given by our Seniors, Hiawatha was a poem studied somewhere in the grades. Now 
— , picture upon picture spreads itself before our eyes. We see the forest, the wigwams, 
the "brothers" and the "little chickens" of Hiawatha. The whole poem is alive with mean- 
ing. As never before, we catch the rhythmical flow of the lines, the beauty of the words and 
the worlds they open, or can open, to those with the key of understanding. 

"Hiawatha" — Who is he? Anyone who saw this play can tell you, — A lad, tall, straight, 
and true as his bow and arrow, as sincere and open as the heavens, as fearless and mighty as 
the mountain lion, and yet as gentle and watchful over his people as a mother bird is to her 

young! 

If we did not come away from this entertainment without higher ideals, deeper under- 
standing and broader sympathy for all people, something must be wrong with us. 

H. V. C, '26 



64 



THE NORMALOGUE 



,'di, C/,1' 



/; 




The quality of music is not strained, 

It cometh from the gentle voices of Juniors 

Upon our judges ears. 

It is twice praised, 

It praises her that sings and her that wins. 

'Tis mightiest in the Juniors 

It becomes a lively contest 

Better than the Seniors goal. 

Their voices show the training they have had; 

The attribute to the interest for the test. 

But music doth then show likest contest, 

When Seniors are good losers. 



Vera Dunn, '25 



^rljool £fat£0 



'ijfT HAS been the great pleasure and privilege of the students to receive, as a visitor, the 
*** former principal of this school, whom we all consider a personal friend. Mr. Murdock 
made us love and appreciate more than ever our Alma Mater and her growth to her present 
high standing, by telling us of her beginning and development through the twenty seven 
years since her founding. Although retired from active service, Mr. Murdock's spirit still ling- 
ers in our school where we hear so often his name mentioned in love and praise. 

Doris M. Chittim, '25 



C0 

l-H 

< 









































jqSuBg SS !PM 




































paBuuB^s 




































srnjoq 












tN 1 




















— 




5J31UBJ 

jaqiBg 






^ 1 


Tf 1 








^ I 


— I 
























""' 1 




























UpJEJM 










>o 1 


























uun a -a 












^ 1 
























U a N.O 


-• 


Tt< 


(N 


» 








CN 






io | 










o 




uuna y 
















-" 1 










CO 1 










UO^U3J 


.N 


CN 




CO j 


*" 1 




""' 1 


*""■ 1 








CN | 


*" 1 


*** i 


<*> i 






dlAOg 




































Aaupic 




— 


•* 


CN 


























ABjjnpv 






CN 




















CN I 


~ 1 








ijjsuiqoBg 












!>. 
























J3AB3 


-> 




N 




lO 


























UBMO^J 






























>o i 






ISBSaapuaj 








tN 




























Jawoj 




















CN 












<t 




U39UUIQ 




















-* 








, | 








jiopqoBy 




































aoSajQDBjY 


CN 




"> 














- 1 








CN 


rt 






ja3uB^] 










r-. 


























AJ3}:>B[S 




































pOOAMpO^J 














f-. 












P«5 




-" 






ua Pa,o 

uapio H 
































— 
















1*5 






















UOSSI^ 




»/■) 










X 














t^ 


v4 


CO 




A9[JBJ 








"- 1 


















CN 










IiaqduiB3 












— 








— 




m 


O 










iJ3^ 






CO 




1^ 












re 














3(003 


















■* 


90 
















ubAm 

* 
















»-H 


* H 


00 
















uosa^puaH 






<*5 










— 




CN 






<*5 










-^P!^ 






*-' 










<*5 

*4 








-" 




<*5 








A9(A\OJ3 










— 




fN 






- 1 
















AJ9>[J03 


-N 




!M 






»« 




rt 


CN 


CO 
















jaqa M 






f*5 






"-" 
























qiiuis 








t> 




























pAo^ 




CN 


O^ 




— 










— 
















aauaqos 




re ; 
rt 1 






1 
1 








i 








CN 




aobjj. 


GC 


1 *"' 


















*-" 


ID 








c, 

£ 

co 

O 

s 


4-> 

CO 

cv 
V 

u 


4-> 
co 
(LI 
u 

> 

cu 


CD 

-4-> 

CS 

a, 

c 

_o 

CO 


co 

cy 

i* 

CS 

E 

CO 


+J 
CO 

-t-> 




a 
E 
ca 
> 


< 


e 

3 
O 

1 

< 

CO 

PQ 


I* 

cy 

M 

C 

c/3 


a 
o 

c 

CS 

Q 

co 

a; 

M 


.O. 
O 

co 

u 

'■)-> 
*-> 


OJ 

2 

> 

o 

-t-i 

CO 

O 

a 




G 
_C 

X 

c. 
£ 
c 
U 
■u 

CO 

V 






CZ5 
U 

H 
in 

< 

•J 









1 


| 






























1 






































1 r» 


^H 


1 "1 
















1 "^ 
















1 ^ 1 


















































— 






















1 rr; j 










1 "" 














1 ^ 






















1 rt 


1 "* 1 














- 1 


























CN 


























«-• 






1 " 










lO 






~ 








CO 1 ON j 
























rn 












1 *"< 1 




n^ 


"- 1 




CN 
























"i- 


O j 












•h J ir> 














f» 








cc 




"- 1 














i/"i 


— 


•- 1 








IT) 




































"* 

T? 




















1 ^ 










L/^ 












^J- 










CO 








— 
















— 








CC 


























PO 






1 " 1 




""/ 








1 ^ 

1 *~ 


~ 










CN 












"■3 1 










— 








<T! 




























P*5 






















"* 














PC 










































CN 










~ 




CN 


*-' 


PO 


1 ^ 1 


















■* 


oo 

CN 


































t> 








to 




CN 


CN 










































t^ 


















CN 
























































"■; 












O 
fN 


T 


T 1 




CN 
















•- 1 






























CN 














CN 1 CD 










C^ 


f*5 














CJ 


















'- 








*"< 














CN 


CN 










V~i 
















CN 








«*> 






















>H 












CN 












'-> 
















CN 


















"- 1 






















1 <^ 1 










































C5 






r*5 | 




































1 ^ 






" 




"- 1 




CN 




oc 

CN 


t^ 








































— 1 


r^ 




" 


f> 














*-• 




CN 










1 ^ 1 


CN 
CN 






















O 












<N 1 CN 1 








&• 


























CN 




Ih 

it 

3 

-J 

■!-> 
CO 

U 

i-j 

u 

Oh 


CO 

cu 
U 


■>-> 
co 

CU 

'5. 
ft 

o 

to 


Ih 

Uh 

co 

CD 
C 
O 

Q 


73 

CU 
Ih 

4-> 

0) 

4-> 

co 

OJ 

m 


■j-j 

CO 

cu 
'c 

C 


o 

Ih 
4-> 

2 

u 


4-1 

CO 

cu 
'co 
'3 


CU 

o 


1- 

cu 

s 

cti 

cu 

Ih 

Q 


4^ 
CO 

CU 

>. 


c. 
'5 

CO 

o 

o 


"=■ 
<*- 
CU 

o 
cs 

U 

o 

■1-1 

CO 

C 


CJ 

c 

d. 
*-> 

CO 

O 


-i-i 
CO 

Ih 
< 


Ih 
O 

03 
Ih 


T3 
(Li 

CU 
O 

CJ 

3 
CO 

c 

-u 
>. 

CU 

M 

-l-> 
co 

o 

fcr-l 


4-1 
CO 

CU 

•3 

c 

CU 

'n 
to 


co 
V 

'co 
co 

u 


co 

CU 

>. 

co 

CU 

-u 
4-1 

o 

Ih 

IX, 


Ih 

0' 

CU 
Cti 

cu 

c- 

cu 

4J 

'C 

c 
to 



THE NORMALOGUE 



67 



formal Wftt 



Note: Lesson Plans are such necessary evils in teaching, it is quite fitting that the members 
of '25 have a copy of one on hand for future reference. The following might serve as a re- 
minder to some who have left all their knowledge about said plans to the Juniors. 



LESSON PLAN 

Gang? 
Leader? 

Careful Expenditure of Time 
Leader's Aim: Nothing in particular. 
Listener's Aim: To please the leader (not the teacher). 



Time: Study Hour 
Room? 



Content 


Material 


Method 


I 


Introduction 


Tongues 


I 


Introduction 




1. Uncultivated voices are 


Pajamas 




1. Anyone who can raise his 




most attractive. 


Pillows 
Couches 

News 




voice above the rest com- 
mands attention of the 
group. 


II 


Procedure 

1. Anything worth doing at 
all is worth doing well. 

2. The longer the tale the 
better. 

3. Competition is the best 
means of motivation. 

4. Regular repetition forms 
the habit. 




II 


Procedure 

1. Talker contributes latest 
scandal heard. 

2. All contribute to said 
topic, "and then some." 

3. After all ye idle gossip 
has been discussed, anyone 
may speak of something clever 
she did or heard of at some 
time. Each story should 
excel the previous one. 

4. This method is continued 
through the evening. 


III 


Conclusion 

1. Lights out please. 




III 


Conclusion 

1. Quarter after. 




(a) Dreamland. 




(a 


.) The meeting is adjourned. 



Katherine Crowley, '25 



ANY OTHER CRITICISMS BY THE CLASS 



Some people claim the owl is wise, 
If that were really true 
It would exclaim: "To whit to whom!" 
And not: "To whit, to who." 



68 THE NORMALOGUE 

Pat: "I'm king in my house now." 

Mike: "Sure, don't I know you are! I was there when your wife crowned you." 



"Have you seen Al?" 
"Al who?" 

i 

"Alcohol. Benzine him last week. Kerosene him yesterday. Gas-e-lined up against 
an oil pump and had a nap-tha." 



TIS A PITY 
Small girl (to poet): "And do you write free verse?" 
Poet: "Judging from my financial returns, yes!" 



THIS DOESN'T APPLY TO OUR PIANO 
(Small girl taking first piano lesson on an old piano). 

Teacher: "Now the white keys are the natural keys and the black keys are the sharps 
and flats." 

Small girl innocently: "Yes, — but what are the yellow keys for?" 



SPEAKING OF FURNITURE 
Lady in furniture store: "I would like to buy an easy chair for my husband." 
Salesman: "Morris?" 
Lady: "No, Gerald." 



ONE THING WE'VE MISSED 
What good will football do in later years? 
Well for one thing it might help one get a seat in a bus. 



YOU WOULDN'T NEED NATURE STUDY FOR THIS 
He: "I admire anyone who sings at her work." 
She: "How you must love a mosquito." 



PROVERBS 
Absence from classes makes the Mark grow rounder. 



SHOULD THIS BE 
He laughs best who laughs when the teacher laughs. 



CORRELATION 
Junior: "Hawaii." 
Senior: "I Hayti tell you." 
Junior: "Au Guam." 



DO YOU BELIEVE THIS 
Teacher: "What are the last teeth that come?" 
Senior: "False teeth." 



Student: "I'm grateful to you for all I know." 
Teacher: "Don't mention it; it's a mere trifle." 



A LITTLE ADVICE 
'Now" reversed spells "Won". A hint to the folks with the tomorrow habit. 



Mrs. Alice R. Bradley 



Beauty Parlors 
206 Kimbell Building 



North Adams 
Massachusetts 



Leon's Millinery 

Stylish Millinery 
at Popular Prices 

51 Main Street, North Adams, Mass. 



Hurd's Jewelry Store 



H. M. Sheehan, Prop. 

1 10 Main Street 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 




See Us About Silverware 



DP. S 

DENTIST 



Compliments of 

RACHDORF'S 



H. MORRIER 

Boots and Shoes 

Repairing done while you wait 



We Carry a Complete Line of Kodaks and Photographic Supplies 

Developing, printing and enlargements promptly and carefully done. 

RICE'S DRUG STORE 

LITCHFIELD'S :-: Cleansers and Dyers 

We specialise on Ladies' and Gents' wearing apparel. Our Methods eliminate 
the dangers of the dust wheel and Drying tumbler. By so doing we protect 
the shape of the garments and save the wear on linings, seams, buttons, etc. 
Pioneer Master Dry Cleaner, 29 years of knowing how. 

14 Ashland St. 4 doors from Main St. Tel. 923 

THE SURPRISE STORE 

The Store of Fashion, Progress, Economy 

81-83 Main Street North Adams, Mass. 

Burlington, Vt., Ogdensburg, N. Y., Rutland, Vt., New York City 



Compliments of 

Wilson House Drug Store 



We are selling a special 

White Silk Broadcloth at $2.00 a yd. 

For practical graduation dresses 

The Rochat Store 



JAFFE'S 

Ladies' Wearing Apparel 

108* MAIN STREET 

iMARTIN'S 

Books Stationery 

Cards School Supplies 

W. E. Lamb Co. 

108 Main Street North Adams, Mass. 

The Home of Good Shoes 

Hosiery Too 

- 

Before you leave for Home 

Be sure and visit North Adams' Leading Dry Goods Store 

Wearables for all occasions 

BOSTON STORE 

North Adams, Mass. 



Compliments of The Imperial 



Rougeau's HairdreSsing Shops 

WORK DONE BY APPOINTMENT 

Manicuring Marcel Waving 

Water Waving Facial Massage 

Hair and Scalp Treatment Bobbing All Styles 

12 Ashland Street, North Adams, Mass. 



Compliments of Nagle Barber Shop 



McCraw & Tatro 

The Store Where Quality 
Reigns Supreme 

SUPERIOR SERVICE and ONE PRICE TO ALL 



Compliments of 

LURIE'S 



zAP&THECslR Y HALL 



■ ■ »i 



EXCELSIOR PRINTING CO, 
NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 






T 



I 



- » - 



■ 

■ •' 



■ 



-a: 



iHwi 



rT 









R